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Helping to reduce reoffending through a broad range of cost-effective prisoner reintegration support services at the Adelaide Remand Centre

In 2019, we signed a new contract with the South Australian Government to operate and manage the Adelaide Remand Centre (ARC) for the South Australia Department for Correctional Services.

Prior to coming under our management, ARC was able to accommodate up to 274 remand prisoners, but the facility is being upgraded under the contract with an increase in total possible occupancy.

Under the contract, we are also developing and implementing a purpose-designed remand strategy with a focus on safety and security, together with managing and preparing prisoners for release or relocation. The strategy supports South Australia’s target to reduce reoffending by 10 percent in the State. We are working with a range of partner organisations to support the delivery of the strategy, including services such as relapse prevention, court advocacy, treatment services and holistic family support.

Our General Manager at ARC, Mark Walters said: “Our vision is to provide an environment where prisoner’s immediate needs are addressed humanely, quickly, and comprehensively. All prisoners will be provided with an integrated throughcare solution, with meaningful activities, relevant interventions and individualised support. Through expanded partnerships with groups including OARS (Offenders Aid Rehabilitation Services) and TAFE (Technical and Further Education) South Australia we are working hard to drive down reoffending.”

Our management of ARC also represents an expected saving for the state government of approximately $5-6 million per year. Minister for Police, Correctional Services and Emergency Services Corey Wingard said: “The transition to Serco management has ensured more taxpayer dollars can be spent on the education of our kids or improving the health system rather than diverting funding to housing alleged criminals.”