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A safe workplace

Our vision is Zero Harm.

Our work is never so urgent that we cannot take time to do it safely.

If you see unsafe conditions or work practices, need additional training, or not sure how to do something safety – ask the question, talk to your manager - Speak Up!

For more information download:

Health, Safety and Environment Group Standard

What you can expect from us:

We want no one to come to harm because of the work we do. So we continually develop and improve our systems and processes to keep everyone safe and well. Including, creating a living culture in which everyone has a high level of health and safety awareness, understands their own personal responsibility for keeping the workplace safe for themselves and others, and is trained and focused on eliminating accidents, near misses and work-related illness.

Our business units have the primary duty to identify and manage health and safety issues in each of their operations. This requires a formal and systematic approach, so risks are identified, assessed, mitigated, and ultimately eliminated.

We share developments, best practices, new approaches, technologies, training and equipment that can help us achieve our vision of Zero Harm across our business.

We also work with our partners, contractors and customers to help ensure they meet our health and safety standards or have equivalent standards in place. When we are contractually obliged to follow a customer's own safety management system, we ensure this meets the health and safety standards we set ourselves.

We expect you to:

  • Actively promote our safety culture and follow our health and safety standards and processes.
  • Understand your personal responsibilities and your personal contribution to maintaining a safe workplace.
  • Exercise proper care for your health and well being, and that of everyone who may be affected by what you do - or don't do.
  • Work within any method statement or risk assessment that applies to your work.
  • Wear proper items of personal protection equipment when required, and request replacements if the equipment is damaged.
  • Only operate plant and equipment after you've been trained and are registered as a competent user.
  • Report any defective plant or equipment, or any work activities you believe to be unsafe.
  • Stop work if you believe you are unable to perform your duties safely, and immediately report why.
  • Never participate in disorderly behaviour, substance abuse or any other activity which could cause injury to you or others.
  • Report any accident or dangerous occurrence.
  • Assist with any investigation into an accident or incident.

Our vision is Zero Harm.

The pressure is on to complete a project. Everyone in your team is happy to bypass some of the normal safety procedures to get the job done, and you don't think there's any danger.

If they're willing is it OK?

1. Yes, everyone is fine with it and we're all professionals

Wrong. Please try again.

2. No, it's not okay. Normal safety procedures are there for a reason

Right answer because:

Our Code makes it absolutely clear that "our work is never so urgent that we cannot take time to do it safely."

There are systems and processes in place to ensure safety at all times, and there are no circumstances in which these can be ignored.

Regardless of deadlines, our Code tells us all to:

  • Actively promote our safety culture and follow our health and safety standards and processes
  • Understand your personal responsibilities and your personal contribution to maintaining a safe workplace.
  • Exercise proper care for your health and well being, and that of everyone who may be affected by what you do - or don't do
  • Work within any method statement or risk assessment that applies to your work

No one should ever compromise safety to "get the job done". Our commercial objectives will never take precedence over doing what is right and safe.

3. In this case it's okay because otherwise we won't finish on time

Wrong. Please try again.

Coming down the stairs, a colleague slips where the anti-slip coating has worn.

He twists his ankle and is in some pain. You suggest he reports the incident but he says he is on his way home and can't be bothered - it's only a sprain.

What would you do?
What should you do?

1. Report the incident at once, and try to persuade him to come with you

Right answer because:

Our Code tells us to

"report any accident or dangerous occurrence."

It also makes it clear that Health & Safety is the responsibility of all of us. We are responsible not just for our own safety but also for the safety of others.

So you have a clear responsibility to report this incident, and so does your colleague. You also have a responsibility to assist with any investigation into an accident or incident.
In this case, if this incident isn't reported at once, there could be other potentially more serious accidents.

The colleague who slipped might also have a more serious injury than they suspect. If that's the case they may not be covered if they haven't followed the correct procedure for reporting all accidents. And they may also need time off work.

Always immediately report a health and safety incident or concern to your line manager or Health & Safety representative, so we can rectify the problem and log the incident.

2. Nothing else. You gave him the right advice but he chose to do his thing

Wrong. Please try again.

3. Tell him if he's not better tomorrow he should see someone

Wrong. Please try again.

There's an external investigation into a serious injury at work. The injured colleague will be disabled, but he was at fault.

You are the only eyewitness. If you tell the truth, your colleague could lose out on much needed compensation.

What would you do?

1. I couldn't let a colleague live with no compensation, I'd have to lie

Wrong. Please try again.

2. I'd tell the truth, it's the right thing to do

Right answer because:

Sometimes it may seem like there's a good reason for doing the wrong thing. But there never is. Here you are feeling torn between your loyalty to your friend and telling the truth. But not to tell the truth isn't an option, and could also cause harm to others. So let's work this one through …

Our Code says,

"You have a responsibility to assist with any investigation into an accident or incident, whether that is internal or external."

When you are asked to assist, you must report what you saw accurately and in an unbiased manner.

If an accident isn't properly reported, it could happen again, and it's vital that we all learn from mistakes and errors, so we can train everyone properly and provide a safe working environment.

Your colleague is in a difficult position, but that's not your fault and you were the only one who saw what actually happened. Telling the truth is the only option, you are legally bound to do so – and it is the only way to keep us all safe.

Telling the truth is the only option, you are legally bound to do so – and it is the only way to keep us all safe.

3. I'd excuse myself from the investigation as it's too hard

Wrong. Please try again.

You work in an area with powerful machinery. Whenever a senior manager visits your site with guests they never wear Personal Protection Equipment unlike all the other employees.

Should speak to the manager directly about this?

1. As long as all the workers wear PPE, managers can do what they want

Wrong. Please try again.

2. No, this is a senior manager, it's not my business

Wrong. Please try again.

3. Yes I would speak to the manager, it simply isn't safe

Right answer because:

Health and Safety rules on-site are there to keep us all safe. They apply to everyone, not just to some. There are no exceptions. And we are all responsible for making sure they are followed.
That's why our Code asks everyone to:

  • Actively promote our safety culture and follow our health and safety standards and processes
  • Understand your personal responsibilities and your personal contribution to maintaining a safe workplace.
  • Wear proper items of personal protection equipment when required, and request replacements if the equipment is damaged.

Of course because this is a senior manager and there are guests, you may feel intimidated. But this senior manager should know better and is behaving in an unsafe way. Our Code empowers you to take action whoever is violating it:

"You have a responsibility to report any concern when you think there may be a violation of our Code, and never knowingly allow or encourage anyone to do anything that violates our Code."

Not wearing safety equipment is in violation of our Code and isn't safe. So you must Speak Up!

Unsafe conditions or work practices? Need additional training? Need more information to do it safely? Speak Up.

Dilemma 1

The pressure is on to complete a project. Everyone in your team is happy to bypass some of the normal safety procedures to get the job done, and you don't think there's any danger.

If they're willing is it OK?

1. Yes, everyone is fine with it and we're all professionals

Wrong. Please try again.

2. No, it's not okay. Normal safety procedures are there for a reason

Right answer because:

Our Code makes it absolutely clear that "our work is never so urgent that we cannot take time to do it safely."

There are systems and processes in place to ensure safety at all times, and there are no circumstances in which these can be ignored.

Regardless of deadlines, our Code tells us all to:

  • Actively promote our safety culture and follow our health and safety standards and processes
  • Understand your personal responsibilities and your personal contribution to maintaining a safe workplace.
  • Exercise proper care for your health and well being, and that of everyone who may be affected by what you do - or don't do
  • Work within any method statement or risk assessment that applies to your work

No one should ever compromise safety to "get the job done". Our commercial objectives will never take precedence over doing what is right and safe.

3. In this case it's okay because otherwise we won't finish on time

Wrong. Please try again.

Dilemma 2

Coming down the stairs, a colleague slips where the anti-slip coating has worn.

He twists his ankle and is in some pain. You suggest he reports the incident but he says he is on his way home and can't be bothered - it's only a sprain.

What would you do?
What should you do?

1. Report the incident at once, and try to persuade him to come with you

Right answer because:

Our Code tells us to

"report any accident or dangerous occurrence."

It also makes it clear that Health & Safety is the responsibility of all of us. We are responsible not just for our own safety but also for the safety of others.

So you have a clear responsibility to report this incident, and so does your colleague. You also have a responsibility to assist with any investigation into an accident or incident.
In this case, if this incident isn't reported at once, there could be other potentially more serious accidents.

The colleague who slipped might also have a more serious injury than they suspect. If that's the case they may not be covered if they haven't followed the correct procedure for reporting all accidents. And they may also need time off work.

Always immediately report a health and safety incident or concern to your line manager or Health & Safety representative, so we can rectify the problem and log the incident.

2. Nothing else. You gave him the right advice but he chose to do his thing

Wrong. Please try again.

3. Tell him if he's not better tomorrow he should see someone

Wrong. Please try again.

Dilemma 3

There's an external investigation into a serious injury at work. The injured colleague will be disabled, but he was at fault.

You are the only eyewitness. If you tell the truth, your colleague could lose out on much needed compensation.

What would you do?

1. I couldn't let a colleague live with no compensation, I'd have to lie

Wrong. Please try again.

2. I'd tell the truth, it's the right thing to do

Right answer because:

Sometimes it may seem like there's a good reason for doing the wrong thing. But there never is. Here you are feeling torn between your loyalty to your friend and telling the truth. But not to tell the truth isn't an option, and could also cause harm to others. So let's work this one through …

Our Code says,

"You have a responsibility to assist with any investigation into an accident or incident, whether that is internal or external."

When you are asked to assist, you must report what you saw accurately and in an unbiased manner.

If an accident isn't properly reported, it could happen again, and it's vital that we all learn from mistakes and errors, so we can train everyone properly and provide a safe working environment.

Your colleague is in a difficult position, but that's not your fault and you were the only one who saw what actually happened. Telling the truth is the only option, you are legally bound to do so – and it is the only way to keep us all safe.

Telling the truth is the only option, you are legally bound to do so – and it is the only way to keep us all safe.

3. I'd excuse myself from the investigation as it's too hard

Wrong. Please try again.

Dilemma 4

You work in an area with powerful machinery. Whenever a senior manager visits your site with guests they never wear Personal Protection Equipment unlike all the other employees.

Should speak to the manager directly about this?

1. As long as all the workers wear PPE, managers can do what they want

Wrong. Please try again.

2. No, this is a senior manager, it's not my business

Wrong. Please try again.

3. Yes I would speak to the manager, it simply isn't safe

Right answer because:

Health and Safety rules on-site are there to keep us all safe. They apply to everyone, not just to some. There are no exceptions. And we are all responsible for making sure they are followed.
That's why our Code asks everyone to:

  • Actively promote our safety culture and follow our health and safety standards and processes
  • Understand your personal responsibilities and your personal contribution to maintaining a safe workplace.
  • Wear proper items of personal protection equipment when required, and request replacements if the equipment is damaged.

Of course because this is a senior manager and there are guests, you may feel intimidated. But this senior manager should know better and is behaving in an unsafe way. Our Code empowers you to take action whoever is violating it:

"You have a responsibility to report any concern when you think there may be a violation of our Code, and never knowingly allow or encourage anyone to do anything that violates our Code."

Not wearing safety equipment is in violation of our Code and isn't safe. So you must Speak Up!

Unsafe conditions or work practices? Need additional training? Need more information to do it safely? Speak Up.